Heneral Luna: The Propaganda Movement would be proud of this film

Heneral Luna is a powerful film. It has earned praise and applause from those who have watched it. But, It has also earned criticism, at least I saw one, because of its unintended effect of favoring martial rule over democratic and libertarian ideals. Then again one must remember the story took place during the Philippine Revolution and the infancy of the Philippine Republic, in particular during the Philippine American War. And despite such criticisms the film is still receives acclaim and applause. More importantly it reminds us the same treachery, incompetence, and corruption that doomed the First Philippine Republic is still eating away at ours.

The film succeeds in telling a powerful story because of efforts of the ensemble performance of the actors, directors, writers, producers, and everyone involved. The story main source come from the work of Vivencio Jose’s THE RISE AND FALL OF ANTONIO LUNA and Nick Joaquin’s iconoclastic work A QUESTION OF HEROES. It is quite evident, if you had read both works previously. The film mixes historical account, gossip and cinematic license to come up with a non-boring account of Luna’s life. A mixture of drama and anecdotal comedy propels the movie along quite nicely to its tragic climax – the assassination, that can only be appreciated on the silver screen.

The film also have homage to a number of historical tidbits, including one a famous painting by Luna’s brother Juan. Unfortunately and probably in the cause of brevity one aspect of Luna’s life was not looked at, Luna the Scientist and his military studies. I often wonder aside from the infamous Luna temper was his training and profession as a scientist made him more impatient and stressed with the politics and bureaucratic malaise of the Malolos Republic?

It would be easy to understand the affinity of the audience to the story of Luna. Just looking at what has happened after independence the same tragedy is happening. The National Tragedy that is reinforced in the film is that two of our heroes and founding fathers, Bonifacio and Luna, were butchered by Filipinos, with the approval of the Malolos Republic leadership.

The film is said to be part of a trilogy: the first being the story of Luna; the second being the story of Gregorio del Pilar; and the third being that of Manuel Quezon. If you look at it carefully it is though one story: It would be the story of Emilio Aguinaldo and the Philippine Republic. All three stories point to three tragic episodes: The Defeat and Fall of the Malolos Republic after Luna; The Capture of Aguinaldo after the fall of Del Pilar; And the Electoral Defeat of Aquinaldo before Quezon at the Commonwealth Election, where the ghosts of Luna and Bonifacio came back to haunt Aguinaldo. The next two films should be worth watching.

Indeed it is a powerful film: It is a powerful story that our Forefathers in the Propaganda Movement would be proud because it moves people to think and hopefully to act.

A question for my students who was Luna the scientist?

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183 Responses to Heneral Luna: The Propaganda Movement would be proud of this film

  1. celzalejandro says:

    Who was Antonio Luna the scientist?
    From an early age he has shown aptitude in chemistry, and has gone on to focus on pharmacy. He even had a paper published entitled El Hematozoario del Paludismo which was about malaria. He also published scientific essays while he was a student. After his doctorate, he went on to study histology and bacteriology so in modern times we can classify him as a sort of biochemist. He even had a background in environmental science and did a study on the Pasig river.

    Personally I find this fascinating! He was a scientist and a sort of poet and a military genius! I just feel like all the Ilustrados were basically the Type A overachievers of their time.

    Basically I think Antonio Luna is a nerd who loves hoarding knowledge about his interests. He must have studied military science intensely, the way he studied hard for chemistry and all his other sciences. I think the reason why he’s so angry all the time is because people don’t get it and people can’t love the country like he does and it’s frustrating for him ’cause he has been ~enlightened~.

    Alejandro, Celina Bianca
    2013-14699
    STS THY

  2. Borromeo, Charenant Jay P. says:

    Heneral Luna was a great movie that depicts the heroic role of General Antonio Luna in depending our beloved land against greedy Americans who want us to become part of their colony. General Luna was strict and used his authority fully that at many points, people fear him and saw him as an abusive general. People hated him, especially the cabinet members of President Aguinaldo. Though he was tough and somehow abusive, the way it was portrayed in the movie did not make him annoying to watch. Because the movie was on his point of view, all the things he did, though his values were not pleasing, were understandable.

    His strong love for his country turned him into a general from a pharmacist. We could not deny the fact that he was brilliant in many aspects. He had his doctorate in Pharmacy in Madrid in 1890. He did research in histology and bacteriology, and did medical analysis. More than that, he even contributed to leading scientific journals of his time. But these facts were not presented in the movie. A scene where in his mother told him that he could have been a great doctor was the only scene that speaks about his past profession.

    Luna made a great choice to become a general because we really need a genius man like him.But I was so disappointed because he died from our own hands.

    Borromeo, Charenant Jay
    2013-78885
    STS THY

  3. Raymille Orquiza says:

    I believe that there is still so much for us to know about Antonio Luna: More than being a Filipino general who fought against the United States, he was also a highly recognized Filipino scientist. His scientific works and researches, specifically about pharmaceutical and environmental sciences, made an impact and left a mark to the science that we now have in the Philippines.

    To have a glimpse of his scientific backgrounds: During the 1880s, Luna graduated from Ateneo Municipal de Manila, earning his first Bachelor of Arts Degree in Chemistry. Wanting to further develop his skills in the field, he continued his study of Chemistry along with literature at the University of Santo Tomas. At the same university, he also studied military science. After finishing his studies here in the Philippines, he moved to Madrid and got his license and doctorate degree in Pharmacy. His doctoral thesis on malaria (El Hematozoario del Paludismo) in 1893 was highly recognized by science professionals and students. Only until then did he move to Paris and Belgium to study Bacteriology, Histology, and Medical Chemistry — Still, the long list of Luna’s scientific achievements continued even after he returned to the Philippines.

    Although the story of Antonio Luna as a scientist was not seen in the film, if we would go beyond the scenes, we could actually tell that Antonio Luna was indeed a science master. He had absolutely carried the characteristics of a scientist and made full use of it while he was a general. First, his critical thinking that was seen when he was strategizing the base locations for the war. Second, his sharp observation in the events that were occurring around him. And lastly, his courage to take on risks just to get the outcome beneficial for him and for our nation.

    Raymille Darra T. Orquiza
    2014-61509
    STS THX

  4. Anina says:

    We know Heneral Luna as the abrasive and rash military man that the history books have described him to be. However, it is also good to know Antonio Luna’s scientist side. He has won a top prize for his paper entitled Two Fundamental Bodies of Chemistry while studying literature and chemistry at the University of Sto. Tomas. After he left the country for Spain, he earned his license and a doctorate in pharmacy at the Universidad de Barcelona and Universidad Central de Madrid.
    He also received another distinction for his scientific paper on Malaria, to an extent that he was commissioned by Spain to study further about the disease. When he came back to the country, he became the chief chemist of the Municipal Laboratory of Manila.

  5. Chelsie Ty says:

    The film, Heneral Luna shows us Antonio Luna as the gallant and exemplary military tactician. One evidence of this was when he courageously went through the trenches and lead the charge against the Americans during a battle.

    Aside from being a brilliant military general, Antonio Luna was also a scientist. He excelled in the sciences especially in the field of chemistry. When he was studying in University of Santo Tomas, his essay, “Dos Cuerpos Fundamentales de la Quimica” won first prize. After further study in Madrid, Luna earned a licentiate and a doctorate in Pharmacy. He also worked in Paris where he did research in histology and bacteriology. In the film, his mother mentioned that he could have been great and accomplished doctor. It is truly amazing how Antonio Luna did not chose to think about his own well being, but instead, he dedicated his life to fight for the freedom and future of our country.

    Sources:
    http://www.mb.com.ph/history-general-antonio-luna-great-soldier-scientist/

    http://www.philstar.com/science-and-technology/601469/general-antonio-luna-scientist-soldier-and-revolutionary

    Chelsie Ty
    2015-07282
    STS THX

  6. Ma. Yna Shiela Sunga says:

    It’s always amazing to witness a character with an all-together extraordinary side to his being, and it’s also incredibly admirable that as he played the role of the general of the country, Gen. Antonio Luna was also well educated and academically accomplished.

    He was also known in the field of science. Developing a paper in malaria gave him the opportunity to venture into learning more about different sorts of diseases. This was while he was in Spain. He also received his license and doctorate degree in pharmacy there. When he was still in the Philippines, he even studied chemistry and went to the University of Sto. Tomas.

    This is sufficient proof that we don’t always have to just stick to one side of the coin. We can be good at multiple things as long as we leave our options open and widen our horizons.

    In the film, Heneral Luna, the general was introduced as the powerful and influential leader that he was. It is sad though that a man of his calibre and greatness fell in the hands of those with selfish and greedy intentions for the country.

    Nowadays, this is reality.

    However, it is never too late to hope for change, especially if change is all we can truly hope for now.

    Source: http://www.filipiknow.net/facts-about-antonio-luna/

    Sunga, Ma. Yna Shiela
    2015-01514
    STS THX

  7. Eye-opener and heart-pounding scenes equipped with sharp thoughts and lines that make the film not your boring type of history films that simply bombard you with historical facts. Not to mention its well-crafted story line and excellent cinematography this film is indeed a film worthy of one’s every centavo.
    Being a historical film, it diverges from the usual “perfect” like protagonist who is so much sensationalized to be able to evoke empathy. Heneral Luna was portrayed as a human– having flaws particularly his stubbornness and uttering of foul words. This did not demoralized the protagonist yet it was able to build a better rapport to the audience making them relate to the character itself and also have fun on the lines being delivered.
    In addition to that, it cannot be denied that it was not just simply a depiction from the past that informs us of what our country had been, but rather serves as an eye-opener to everyone that such events are still in existent at present—-having leaders like Aguinaldo who do not act immediately on the needs of his people, having countrymen who are against each other brought about by the hunger for power( Felipe Buencamino, Capt. Janolino, General Tomas Mascardo and Pedro Paterno against Heneral Luna), having less number of Filipinos like Heneral Luna who can actually be brave enough to voice out their thoughts against the faulty system , and having only few Filipinos who are willing to risk his life for the love of the country as embodied by Heneral Luna, Lt. Garcia, Capt. Eduardo Rusca, Capt. Paco Roman, Capt. Jose Bernal and Capt. Manuel Berna.
    The film left its viewers into reflecting if we, the present Filipinos could actually let this tragic scenario to happen or act accordingly into making the mistakes done in the past not happen again.

    Czeskian Z. Realo
    2012-31938
    STS THX

  8. Eye-opener and heart-pounding scenes equipped with sharp thoughts and lines that make the film not your boring type of history films that simply bombard you with historical facts. Not to mention its well-crafted story line and excellent cinematography this film is indeed a film worthy of one’s every centavo.
    Being a historical film, it diverges from the usual “perfect” like protagonist who is so much sensationalized to be able to evoke empathy. Heneral Luna was portrayed as a human– having flaws particularly his stubbornness and uttering of foul words. This did not demoralized the protagonist yet it was able to build a better rapport to the audience making them relate to the character itself and also have fun on the lines being delivered.
    In addition to that, it cannot be denied that it was not just simply a depiction from the past that informs us of what our country had been, but rather serves as an eye-opener to everyone that such events are still in existent at present—-having leaders like Aguinaldo who do not act immediately on the needs of his people, having countrymen who are against each other brought about by the hunger for power( Felipe Buencamino, Capt. Janolino, General Tomas Mascardo and Pedro Paterno against Heneral Luna), having less number of Filipinos like Heneral Luna who can actually be brave enough to voice out their thoughts against the faulty system , and having only few Filipinos who are willing to risk his life for the love of the country as embodied by Heneral Luna, Lt. Garcia, Capt. Eduardo Rusca, Capt. Paco Roman, Capt. Jose Bernal and Capt. Manuel Berna.
    Also, the film left its viewers into reflecting if we, the present Filipinos could actually let this tragic scenario to happen or act accordingly into making the mistakes done in the past not happen again.

    Czeskian Z. Realo
    2012-31938
    STS THX

  9. Geraldine Madamba says:

    I don’t really write reviews for a movie, let a alone a local one, but the movie Heneral Luna just really stood out and made a huge impact on me that I felt the need to write one. It moved me enough to write a review. Heneral Luna is one of the best filipino films I’ve ever seen. The movie captured the reality of the filipinos at the time of the second phase of the revolution and showed Antonio Luna’s life, his adamant nature, his unwavering loyalty of his vision of what the Philippine Republic should be. Although it is common to show heroes in filipino historical movies as perfect people, it was refreshing to see that the movie showed Antonio Luna’s faults, flaws, braveness and other traits and use it to tell a story. Antonio Luna was portrayed as a deeply flawed man yet he is still a great person. In the movie, he was sometimes abrasive, offensive and arrogant but you can tell that he has stated somewhat right points. But sometimes he went too far with his arrogance and his hotheadedness that he can go to extreme lengths just to prove his points. One example would be the part in the movie where he points his gun at a helpless chicken vendor in order to state a point. Another example would be the part where he forced Tomas Mascardo to go back from Arayat to join the forces in Calumpit. However, that arrogance is not just hot air. Luna is a deeply uncompromising man, who believes that Filipinos should start to stir away from petty regionalism and instead be united. The movie masterfully shows different sides of Luna and how each sides fits into the other.

    Now Filipinos remember Antonio Luna as brave, brilliant and as a tactician of the second phase of the revolution. He was also known for being a hothead but never as the excellent scientist that he was. Aside from his military expertise, Luna was a very well educated man. His paper on chemistry won him top prize while he was studying literature and chemistry at the University of Sto. Tomas. After moving to Spain, he earned his license and doctorate in pharmacy at the Universidad de Barcelona and Universidad Central de Madrid respectively. Furthermore, his scientific paper on malaria was very well-received and he was even given a commission by the Spanish to study tropical and communicable diseases. When he went back to the Philippines, he won the the contest to become the chief chemist of the Municipal Laboratory of Manila. Luna also analyzed the Sibul mineral waters, and was the first to study forensic science in the Philippines, studying human blood and now it could be used as evidence in crime investigation.

    Sources:
    http://www.whatsageek.com/movies/heneral-luna-review
    http://www.philstar.com/science-and-technology/601469/general-antonio-luna-scientist-soldier-and-revolutionary
    https://runningpinoy.wordpress.com/2015/09/22/heneral-luna/
    http://www.filipiknow.net/facts-about-antonio-luna/

  10. Bianca Senador says:

    “He was the only general the Filipino Army ever had”

    Heneral Luna was a man of many talents, from art to music to even guerrilla tactics, his knowledge and talent showed no bounds.

    He studied out of the country with his brother Juan Luna, earning himself a doctorate. He also published a paper on Malaria which was greatly received by the scientific community during his time. He was a man of many talents, he had great skill in writing, he was one of the founding members alongside Rizal for La Solidaridad with his pen name taga-ilog. When he had been captured by the Spanish his view on fighting for freedom changed, under the tutelage of General Gerard Leman (Belgium) he studied the art of war concentrating on guerrilla tactics and anything he would have thought useful in modern warfare. He had knowledge not only in the field of science, but also in the field of military science which has proven time and again how much of a threat he was not only towards his enemies but to the people who perceive him as merely a pawn in their game.

    The movie Heneral Luna is an eye- opener to the public that not everything taught in school is to be assumed right and all- encompassing. Most of my school life concerning Philippine history has been centered around how the Spanish, colonizing us for more than 333 years, have been cruel to the Filipinos, but they have constantly glossed over the fact that the Spaniards and the Japanese weren’t the only ones who had an agenda in colonizing the Philippines. In my memory as a student, our history with the Americans has been constantly glossed over, quickly going through it and jumping ahead to the Second World war, where the Japanese invaded the Philippines.

    Heneral Luna was a smart movie, transporting all of the viewers back to the start of the American- FIlipino war. This war in the Philippines was one of the lesser- known wars (based on my schooling) that had happened in the Philippines. This movie showed how one person defied the odds, he has made all of us realize that the foreigners aren’t our only enemy, but ourselves as well. In the end, we all have to ask, who do we fight for?

    I highly recommend this movie to everyone and anyone who believes that the Filipino is worth fighting for.

    Bianca Senador
    2012-62553
    STS THY

  11. Katrina Isabel Trillana says:

    “Nasubukan mo na bang hulihin ang hangin?” came Mabini’s rhetorical question to Aguinaldo as they spoke about Heneral Luna. And indeed it was true. Heneral Luna was a lot like the wind, with his unpredictability and angst. Heneral Luna the Scientist may have been his technical profession as a doctor abroad. But for me, Juan Luna the Scientist is the skeptic, curious, strong-willed man he is who never stopped “hypothesizing” and “experimenting” on how he could save his Motherland from the reins of the foreigners. He can never be suppressed and contained, he is always on the move, and he leaves a lasting effect to the places he has been and the lives he has touched. I viewed Heneral Luna as a very strong character, as someone who has no intention to submit, to subdue his ego, or compromise his principles. “Isn’t that the problem with Luna?” I asked a friend of mine as we exited the cinema. “He was too proud to listen, too angry to negotiate, always in the extremes.”

    “That’s the best thing about him,” she replied. And I guess it was, indeed, until the end. When we’re always angry about the present state of the things around us and as we see all the wrongs in our society, there will be discontent, and with discontent comes the passion and desire to change things for the better. Perhaps that’s the thing that’s missing from most Filipinos today. We always ask what the government has done for the country, but have we ever asked ourselves what we have for the country? Perhaps we have been too preoccupied with other things in this modern era to actually feel the burning passion that our past heroes felt for the country. Perhaps we have been too apathetic to be angry. Perhaps we became too tired or we felt too helpless to do something to change our situation. This film, however, aims to reverse this way of thinking among Filipinos as it gets its message across. As early as now, it is clear that Heneral Luna has been an effective means to remind us Filipinos of the brave fight our heroes fought: a fight worth fighting, for a country worth fighting for. The fight is not yet done. As it goes, “Ang taong may damdamin ay ‘di alipin.”

  12. Jed Patrick P. Datu says:

    In addition to being a soldier, Antonio Luna was also an accomplished scientist. During his younger years at school, he had strong skills in chemistry and other sciences. He achieved a Bachelor of Arts degree at Ateneo Municipal de Manila at 1881. His Jesuit teachers praised him for his aptitude in chemistry and encouraged him to improve it further. He went to study in the University of Santo Tomas and won first prize in a competition for his paper entitled “Two Fundamental Bodies of Chemistry.”

    Later, in 1886, Luna moved to Madrid and went on to earn a Licentiate and Doctorate in Pharmacy. In 1893, he had his doctoral thesis on malaria entitled “El Hematozoario del Paludismo” which was favorably received by physicians and medical scientists. After completing his doctorate, He moved to Paris, where he researched bacteriology and histology at the Pasteur Institute, and later to Belgium, where he studied medical chemistry.

    With all his academic attainments, Luna moved back to the Manila after receiving a research grant from the Spanish government. Here, he studied tropical and communicable diseases. He took the position of Chemist Expert of the Municipal Laboratory of Manila and was the first person there to conduct environmental studies. One of them was the researching of the contents of several sources of water, which he found to be unfit to drink. He also was the first person to conduct a study on Philippine forensic science, studying human blood and how it could be used as evidence when investigating crimes.

    Luna’s focus on science was later replaced by his interest in fencing and then in the Philippine revolution, where he aided the his countrymen in attaining independence from the Spanish. While he is most known as a tough and heroic general, his pharmaceutical and environmental science findings both left their mark on his country.

    Reference: http://biography.yourdictionary.com/articles/antonio-luna-biography.html

  13. Jude Geron says:

    Antonio Luna knows what he wants accomplished, and gets it done in the most direct way possible, with no regard for anything in his way. That is a brief way to describe the character that headlined Jerrold Tarrog’s Heneral Luna. It was this attitude that led to his untimely demise, and while in many circumstances, a number would feel relief at the elimination of such a brazen character, Luna’s graphic assassination after a series of exploits as a general of the Philippine war effort, many of the audience, including myself, felt otherwise.

    “What’s new? ”

    That is the question that rang in my mind throughout my viewing of the movie. Despite the cinematic license when it came to the portrayal of both the characters and the events, the message of the film, at least in my view, remained clear. An image of the country marred by a weak sense of nationalism was painted together with bouts of both humor and violence, and looking at the country’s history and culture, it would not be difficult to trace its roots, and see its manifestations in the present. An attempt at breaking the status quo cost Luna his life, somehow symbolic of those who have meant well and mean well in the past and present.

    As the film effectively portrayed Luna’s hot temper and illustrated what took place in his life throughout the Philippine-American war, one would be surprised to discover some fascinating information about Luna unrelated to his military position. Further reading would describe Antonio Luna not solely as a war tactician, but also as a scientist. He took a liking to chemistry in his days in Ateneo Municipal de Manila, and took further studies in the field at University of Sto Tomas, where he won first prize in a science essay contest. He event had the opportunity to receive a doctorate degree in Pharmacy abroad, studying in Spain, France and Belgium, and had his work published in journals with acclaim from fellow scientists. With a research grant, he returned to the Philippines to engage in further applied work.

    While these details were left out to highlight a key moment not just in the life of Antonio Luna, but in our nation’s history, the film does indirectly encourage people to read up further on his life and the lives of other well-known Filipinos from this period. Doing so in this case has yielded very interesting information.

    Source: http://www.philstar.com/science-and-technology/601469/general-antonio-luna-scientist-soldier-and-revolutionary

    Geron, Jude Benedict T.
    2012-58087
    STS THY

  14. Stephanie Sison says:

    I liked the film Heneral Luna. It depicts the heroism of Luna without putting him up on a pedestal like a saint. It gives the film more depth and enriches the character of Luna. He becomes more human in the realest sense with his flaws balanced out by his strong sense of nationalism.

    However, I would have liked to see Luna more than just a general. He is a scientist and an artist who have contributed in those fields as well. It would have been better to see a side of him apart from what we learned from the textbooks.

    On another note, I would recommend this to the youth as it would really change you as a person. This is one of those films that hit you in the heart and will make you ponder what you’ve been doing with your life. I think that until now, Luna is still an influential leader. I would know because after watching the film, I berated myself for being apathetic. I also had this realisation and feeling of not wanting to disappoint Luna and let his death be in vain, no matter how decades it’s been.

    Stephanie Sison
    2011-42405
    STS THY

  15. Francis Dale Ambrocio says:

    In my opinion, Heneral Luna the scientist was more inclined to the military perspective of science. Although he had studied about chemistry, he’s way of thinking applied more in a war setting. As the movie mentioned, he was the only general the FIlipino Army had at that time,That part of him was greatly showed in the movie which rare in Philippine Cinema. The movie became an eyeopener to the people especially the young adults who can see that what happened in the past is still happening today.

    Francis Ambrocio
    2012-04618
    STS THX

  16. Kathleen Gail Tomas says:

    Aside from being the military genius that he is, Antonio Luna was also a man who had great knowledge on pharmacy, chemistry, and other fields of the sciences.

    After watching the movie, my eyes were literally just open. I slightly forgot how to blink because of the realization that majority of the parts of the movie are true. Despite the movie being humorous, I had one thing in mind that wasn’t very laugh-worthy: betrayal. Betrayal was the cause of our fall to the Americans. Betrayal was caused by each and everyone’s pride.

    It is so sad to think that fellow Filipinos were instruments to the “enemies”. It was true, what Luna said, that our enemy is ourselves. We focus on our selfish ambitions to the point that we forget that our goal is to reach the common good.

    May this movie inspire our sense of nationalism and boost our love for our country and our people. This is absolutely a must-watch.

    Kathleen Gail L. Tomas
    2015-00361
    STS THY

  17. Matthew Chua says:

    I stumbled upon the article of Dr. Vallejo and was astounded that Antonio Luna was so accomplished in the sciences. He had a degree in chemistry from University of Santo Tomas and a Doctorate in Pharmacy. I agree that Luna the scientist was not showcased in the film. He was portrayed as a great military man. He could have quite easily become a national scientist based on his research if such an honor even existed during that time. Very few people can match his achievements even during our age where postgraduate studies are becoming more common. Even before he became a military man he already contributed to the country through his studies while serving as the Chemist Expert in Manila. It was really unfortunate that such a talented and smart man died the way he did.

    Source:http://www.philstar.com/science-and-technology/601469/general-antonio-luna-scientist-soldier-and-revolutionary

  18. Arianne Rose S. Agustin says:

    For me Heneral Luna is one of the “rare” Filipino who will fight for our “true” freedom even if he will step on to the “pseudo” principles of traitor Filipinos. He is an eye opener. Just imagine if our fellow countrymen accept the reality that foreigner will always have internal motives, maybe we are enjoying now the results of it.

    Many of the Filipinos back then were so greedy and full of themselves. They can’t let go of their wealth in short; money over nationalism. That’s why Heneral Luna was so angry with Filipinos who love to sacrifice our welfare for their own interest. Heneral Luna might be short tempered but I do believe he only wanted the Filipinos that time to realize that we should not depend our destiny to invaders. They will just cause the nation to have different identities. As a country, we should know our country’s identity but it looks like we recognize other countries’ identities as ours. How embarrassing right?

    Heneral Luna is not a perfect general but what I like about him is that until his last breath, he is still fighting for the deserve rights and liberty of the country. He wanted everyone to support their co-Filipinos and build trust to everyone. He wanted to remove “kalaban ng kakampi”. I hope we are not only opposing to this kind of mechanism but also proposing actions and solutions.

    Arianne Rose S. Agustin
    2013-05202
    STS-THX

  19. Rain Mauleon says:

    Prior to the film ‘Heneral Luna’, not much was known about General Antonio Luna except that he and Dr. Jose Rizal once fought over a woman whom they were both interested in and that he was the brother of Spoliarium painter, Juan Luna. This is probably one of the primary reasons why the film became an instant hit to the Filipino masses. It reintroduced a hero whose brilliance and bravery could have possibly ended our years of colonization long before it reached nearly four centuries, should he have been granted full military allegiance and national support. Unlike many forms of media which often fabricate stories or sugarcoat realities, ‘Heneral Luna’ provided the public with the truth.

    Whether or not one agrees with the implied ‘truths’ projected in the movie, it cannot be denied that the film emphasized the incontestable fact that the Filipino was, is, and will always be responsible for his own well-being, regardless of the outside forces that attempt to seize his control over himself and all things that are rightfully his.

    Unlike most historical films set at the period of colonization, ‘Heneral Luna’ did not focus on the inhumanity of our conquerors (in this case, the Americans). Rather, it stressed the underlying cause of our inability to gain independence from the Americans. During their reign in the country, they engaged in business with the Filipinos in the high society. Expectedly, these same people were involved in the Philippine government at that time. In the movie, many of them showed uncertainty when influenced by General Luna to revolt against the Americans, as they were benefiting from them, and when Luna persisted on eradicating these foreigners, the said high society Filipino leaders treated him as enemy which later led to his murder. As further emphasized in the movie, it was the Filipino (the nation) who murdered his general with his selfish ambition and cowardice. It was he who prolonged his own agony before his liberation. It was he who allowed himself to play by the rules of others in his own game.

    This truth and the challenge it leaves the present-day Filipino nation to take full responsibility for himself make the film ‘Heneral Luna’ an exceptional one. We may be free from colonizers, but not from our own selfishness, ignorance, and negligence towards our country.

    In hindsight, the film has made it a point to persuade the Filipino youth to become more like General Luna, atleast in terms of nationalism. What was not shown in the film was his life before he took an active role in the military– a life that deserves recognition as well.

    General Luna was a scientist: a researcher and a chemist. He is a Chemistry degree holder who took up military science and literature as well. He was recognized for his research on communicable diseases such as malaria. He became a chief chemist in the Municipal Laboratory of Manila and was also a pharmacist.

    General Antonio Luna, although known for his impatience and bad temper had undoubtedly contributed much more to the Filipinos than he has been given credit for. His heart was that for service, in the field of science and politics (in the form of military service). I applaud everybody behind the film and recommend everyone to watch it because it introduces us to an underrated hero who may ignite the seemingly dying love and passion that the Filipino must have for himself and for his country.

    Rosan Lorraine Dizon Mauleon
    2015 – 08933
    STS THX

  20. Terrence Ferdinand S. Nagaño says:

    The film that stormed the social media sphere and spawned hundreds of memes, discussions, and “hugot lines” – Heneral Luna. The movie deciphered and presented a largely forgotten part of Philippine history, the Philippine-American War. It explored the life of the titular character in all of his essence: the good and the bad, the ingenious and the bad-tempered. It was actually very refreshing to see a film that, aside from the good qualities, also highlights the character flaws of the hero. It showcased “Luna the human” not “Luna the god-like hero”.

    Antonio Luna is principally famous as the hot-headed disciplinarian general. In the mainstream historical narratives, he is known for using the sword more often than that of the pen. But, in reality, he is more than “Heneral Artikulo Uno”.

    Luna’s early life is somewhat comparable to that of Rizal’s. Like Rizal, he is a Renaissance-esque man. He is a man of many fields other than military tactics and strategies. One of the less commonly known is “Luna the scientist”.

    Luna was a gifted student. He possessed profound knowledge in chemistry and other sciences, and in 1881 attained a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Ateneo Municipal de Manila, graduating with highest honor. He continued his studies in pharmacy, literature, and music in the University of Santo Tomas. While studying, he won the top prize in a competition for his paper entitled “Two Fundamental Bodies Of Chemistry.”

    Luna was then sent by his parents to Spain to join his brother Juan, who was there studying painting. In Spain, he acquired a Licentiate in Pharmacy at Universidad de Barcelona in 1886 followed by his earning of the Doctorate in Pharmacy from the Universidad Central de Madrid in 1890. In 1893, his scientific treatise on malaria, “El Hematozoario del Paludismo”, was well-received by the scientific community. He then traveled to Paris where he researched on bacteriology and histology at the Pasteur Institute, and continued in Belgium where he studied medical chemistry.

    Luna’s abilities as a scientist were recognized by the Spanish government. Thus, he was commissioned to study tropical and communicable diseases. A year later, he returned to the Philippines and was appointed as the chief chemist of the Municipal Laboratory of Manila. In this post, he analysed the Sibul mineral waters and was the first to study forensic science in the Philippines.

    Antonio Luna was not just the “Antonio Luna” that is described in conventional historical contexts. He was a thinker – a scientist. However, his contributions to science are often overshadowed by his proverbial hotheadedness and the part he played in the Philippine-American War. General Luna is more familiar than Dr. Luna, right?

    REFERENCES:
    Antonio Luna Biography. (n.d.). Retrieved October 5th, 2015, from http://biography.yourdictionary.com/articles/antonio-luna-biography.html
    History: General Antonio Luna, great soldier, scientist. (2014, October 29). Manila Bulletin. Retrieved October 5, 2015, from http://www.mb.com.ph/history-general-antonio-luna-great-soldier-scientist/
    Szczepanski, K. (n.d.). Antonio Luna, Hero of the Philippine – American War. Retrieved October 4, 2015, from http://asianhistory.about.com/od/philippines/fl/Antonio-Luna-Hero-of-the-Philippine-American-War.htm
    Dumindin, A. (n.d.). June 5, 1899: Assassination of Gen. Antonio Luna. Retrieved October 5, 2015, from http://philippineamericanwar.webs.com/lunaassassination.htm

    Terrence Ferdinand S. Nagaño
    2015-04845
    STS THX

  21. Aira Zalzos says:

    Luna the scientist was Hen. Luna itself. Before he joined the uprising, Hen. Luna studied literature and chemistry at University of Santo Tomas; and later got his licentiate and doctorate in Spain.

    However, being a scientist didn’t just apply if you achieved stuffs like those. Anyone can be a scientist in their own way like what Hen. Luna did. He made use of the science (organized knowledge) and technology (applied knowledge) in war through assessing the situations; making plans including forming his Luna Sharpshooters and Black Guard; and using the warfare tools. That’s why, Hen. Luna was known as one of the bravest and wisest general in the Philippines.

    Sadly, no matter how great a person was, just like what he said: “the greatest enemy is ourselves”, Hen. Antonio Luna was assassinated by former President Aguinaldo.

    Source:
    (n.d.). Retrieved October 4, 2015, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonio_Luna
    Science and Technology in War – Military History – Oxford Bibliographies – obo. (n.d.).
    Retrieved October 5, 2015, from http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-
    9780199791279/obo-9780199791279-0054.xml

    Aira J. Zalzos
    2012-10275
    STS-THX

  22. Maricris Santos says:

    The movie Heneral Luna was not only entertaining but also informational. It’s a great movie since it portrays stories/anecdotes that most Filipinos do not learn in classrooms. As they say, history is written by the victors. There are facts that are changed in order favor some people. And this film is one of the few creations that are made to let the people know what really happened.

    However, the story merely told about the military life of Heneral Luna. The people behind this movie failed to portray that Heneral Luna was also a scientist. As a child, he possessed strong skills in chemistry and other sciences. He even earned a bachelor of arts degree from Ateneo in 1881. He also moved to Madrid in 1886 and earned a Licentiate in Pharmacy. Aside from that, he earned a Doctorate in Pharmacy in 1890. These facts may not have been important to be included in the story, but it would make people learn who Heneral Luna really was.

    Heneral Luna can also be called a scientist not only because of his aptitude for general science but also for his knowledge in military science. He possessed the critical thinking skills that are necessary to make strategies and to lead an army. He’s indeed one of the wisest generals Philippines has ever had.

    I’m hoping that our country will produce more movies like this so that people may know the real story behind every hero our country had.

  23. TRISHA DENISE D. CEDEÑO says:

    Mahal mo nga ang Pilipinas
    ngunit
    hindi mo ito kayang ipaglaban.

    Nalunod ako sa lalim ng mga sinabi ni Heneral Artikulo Uno; ang daming pakahulugan.
    At may isa pa akong natutunan, ito ay ang manatili hanggang sa huli [ng palabas]. Dahil may mga mahahalagang bagay na maaaring dumating ngunit baka malampasan mo lang dahil umalis ka na agad at sumuko [Hello, Heneral del Pilar!!!].

    HUHU hindi ko na masabi ang mga dapatkong sabihin dahil para akong nalumpo pagkatapos panoorin ang Heneral Luna at nanginig na lang ang mga tuhod ko sa galit dahil kitang-kita sa mga Pilipino ngayon ang kawalan ng pagkakaisa.

    Ang sakit lang na tayo ‘yung dapat na magkaka-kampi at nagtutulungan pero kinakalaban natin ang isa’t isa.

    Parang ako.
    Parang ikaw.

    Parang tayo.

    Nakakalungkot.

    <///3

    201120886
    STS THX

  24. Pauline says:

    Gen. Antonio Luna was one of the most historically acclaimed leaders during the Philippine Revolution. But has anyone ever noticed that aside from being a great leader, he is also known as a scientist? Not all are aware of Luna’s scientific escapades mainly because of how historians have told his story.

    During his childhood year, he was noted for his great knowledge in science, especially in chemistry. He studied abroad and was praised for his research works on histology and bacteriology. He also contributed much to pharmacy and his findings are still recognized today.

    Returning back to his home country, he studied the bacteriolofy of contagious diseases, took the examination for Chemist Expert of the Municipal Lab of Manila and won the post, conducted the first environmental science research in the country including the bacteriological studies of Pasig River water (which he found is unfit for drinking), the therapeutic and chemical properties of Sibul Spring water and the first study on Philippine forensic science, wherein he studied human blood as evidence in judicial hearings.

    Vallejo, B. (2010, August 12). General Antonio Luna: Scientist, soldier and revolutionary. The Philippine Star. Retrieved from http://www.philstar.com/science-and-technology/601469/general-antonio-luna-scientist-soldier-and-revolutionary

    Pauline Angeli B. Adalid
    2012-52627
    STS THX

  25. Rico Dela Cruz says:

    Remembering the movie, we can notice that there is a brief segment wherein Antonio luna was asked by his mother on why he chose his life as a general where in fact he was supported and brought to foreign lands to be highly educated. Being a general is extremely a weighty task and with no doubts, his parents know that, and they are not downsizing Antonio Luna being a general but what kept him away from practicing his profession?

    Being educated lead to his strong sense of nationalism, but is that the sole reason? Maybe seeing the condition of our country being attacked by invaders is just something that tormented him. From a field of science to a general, there is a huge leap and what bridge the two could probably his knowledge in military science. There must be a science in everything he does. All the triumph is merely the application of all the knowledge he has, again, from science.

    These facts about Antonio Luna are not neglected but are obscure to most of us. He has contribution to both fields but made a bigger name as a soldier, being one of the greatest general in our country. Behind all these is Luna the scientist.

    Rico Dela Cruz
    2015-08354
    STS-THX

  26. Jesse David says:

    Heneral Luna is a depiction of the Filipinos who are willing to risk their all (even their life) to defend our country against the abusers of our society.

    Jesse David Doctor
    2013-11425
    STS THY

  27. Rexchelle Aiyla C. Anonas says:

    Heneral Luna is a great eye opener for the Filipinos especially those who are greatly influenced by colonial education. The framing of the film shows a perspective that is, more often than not, depicts how the Filipinos are abused rather than the perspective which shows how the Americans and other foreign invaders ‘helped’ and ‘influenced’ us well. It’s indeed a great film!

    Rexchelle Aiyla Anonas
    2012-17240
    STS THY

  28. Allen Renaldo O. Cruz says:

    “Ignorance is bliss.” This is the famous quote I revisited after hearing my friend’s commentary about the film. “Nakakahiya yung film, dapat hindi ‘to pinayagan ipalabas. It was not that the film was worthless that my friend opposed its screening; it was because it unveiled the embarassing truth regarding our history. However, just like the motto of journalism, “there is no more higher rule in journalism, than to be awfully honest.” This movie should be seen as “the pail is half-full” rather than “half-empty”. This should be taken as a challenge for the Filipino people and not just a vacuum of hope. By seeing it clearer, we would despise it so much that we would do everything to stop it happening until now.

    Allen Cruz
    2012-32153
    STS THX

  29. Adrian Jericson Jimenez says:

    Reading this article and researching about Gen. Luna’s life as a scientist, I came up with a hypothesis. Scientists, especially those living in third world countries where oppression is a serious issue, have a relatively high tendency to be revolutionaries and are revolutionaries in their own ways. Entering the field of science, in the general’s case, medicine, pharmacy in particular, one brings not only the desire to learn and know new things, but also the desire to provide a contribution that will benefit society and that will make better the lives of people—a thing that revolutionaries also desire.

    Moreover, the critical scientific minds of scientists enable them to understand society probably better that anybody does. Heneral Luna probably have employed the scientific method before coming up with the conclusion that the Americans, at that time, are not friends, but rather are foes, of Filipinos, contradictory to, as was illustrated in the film, what Buencamino and Paterno believe.

    Scientists also make the best revolutionaries, perhaps. As what Dr. Benjamin Vallejo stated in his article entitled, “General Antonio Luna: Scientist, soldier and revolutionary”, “…unlike other revolutionists, he used his scientist’s mind in studying and researching on military science, tactics, field fortifications, battalion tactics, national defense and organization in preparation for fighting in the Revolution.”

    Some may disagree with my hypothesis; some may agree. Nevertheless, Gen. Luna did a great job as a scientist, as a revolutionary, and as a Filipino. Someone to look up to, he should serve as an inspiration to us, especially the youth, to make a difference and change the world.

    Adrian Jericson S. Jimenez
    2014-77970
    STS THY

  30. Neil Patrick Ferrer says:

    Upon doing a little research, I was actually surprised to find out that Hen. Antonio Luna was actually a man of science, especially with the way he was portrayed in the film Heneral Luna. I would also admit that prior to watching the film, I didn’t know and I don’t recall that much about Hen. Antonio Luna. I was more familiar with his brother, Juan Luna, the painter, who is known for his famous and controversial painting, the “Spoliarium”.

    The youngest of seven children, Luna was born in Binondo, the commercial district of Manila, on October 29, 1866. He possessed strong skills in chemistry and other sciences, and in 1881 earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Ateneo Municipal de Manila. His college Jesuit teachers recognized his aptitude in chemistry, and encouraged him to study it further. He did study it, along with literature, at the University of Santo Tomas, where his essay entitled “Dos Cuerpos Fundamentales de la Quimica” (“Two Fundamental Bodies of Chemistry”) won first prize in a competition. At the University of Santo Tomas, Luna also studied music, military science, and marksmanship.

    In 1886 Luna moved to Madrid, where he earned a Licentiate in Pharmacy. He went on to earn a Doctorate in Pharmacy in 1890, and his doctoral examiners said he did extremely well. His 1893 doctoral thesis on malaria, entitled “El Hematozoario del Paludismo,” was favorably recognized by both physicians and medical scientists. After completing his doctorate, Luna moved on to Paris, where he researched bacteriology and histology at the Pasteur Institute, and later to Belgium, where he studied medical chemistry.

    After being given a grant for research in 1894 from the Spanish government, Luna moved back to his home of Manila. The grant was to be used to study tropical and communicable diseases. Antonio took a post as the Chemist Expert of the Municipal Laboratory of Manila, where he was the first person to conduct environmental science studies. These studies included researching the contents of several sources of water, which he found to be unfit to drink. He also was the first person to conduct a study on Philippine forensic science, studying human blood and how it could be used as evidence when investigating crimes.

    General Antonio Luna was the first Pinoy scientist with a doctorate (Doctor of Pharmacy), first Pinoy postdoc at Institut Pasteur, and first to study the environmental quality of the Pasig River.

    So, it turns out that Hen. Antonio Lunia was really a man of science. He pursued different fields and branches of science and was actually successful in doing so. He also helped a lot of people with his studies and researches in the field of science and health. But in the end, he is still most known for his contributions in a different field of science, which is “military science”. I think Hen. Luna chose to turn away from the academe and from the study of science because he felt and he knew that during that time, his country needed him more as a military scientist, as a general, and as a leader.

    I think that what people fail to notice is that Hen. Luna is really passionate about the country and all he wants for the Philippines is nothing but the best. I guess the sad part is that he was a little bit consumed and eaten by his pride and ego, and that some people, our own fellow countrymen for that matter, got envious and insecure of him which lead to his demise. Which makes me wonder, what could have the Philippines been if Hen. Antonio Luna went on to live?

    FERRER, Neil Patrick S.
    2012-78997
    STS THX

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